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Man Is Good-natured According To Mencius
Oriental scholars, especially the Chinese men of letters, se...

The Betterment Of Life
Again, people nowadays seem to feel keenly the wound of the ...

Do Thy Best And Leave The Rest To Providence
There is another point of view which enables us to enjoy life...

The Buddha Of Mercy
Milton says: Virtue may be assailed, but never hurt; Surp...

Zen And Supernatural Power
Yoga[FN#250] claims that various supernatural powers can be a...

There Is No Mortal Who Is Purely Moral
By nature man should be either good or bad; or he should be g...

Missionary Activity Of The Sixth Patriarch
As we have seen above, the Sixth Patriarch was a great genius...

Change As Seen By Zen
Zen, like Hinayanism, does not deny the doctrine of Transienc...

Flight Of The Sixth Patriarch
On the following morning the news of what had happened during...

Nature Is The Mother Of All Things
Furthermore, man has come into existence out of Nature. He i...

Zen In The Dark Age
The latter half of the Ashikaga period was the age of arms an...

Epicureanism And Life
There are a good many people always buoyant in spirit and mir...

Enlightenment Is Beyond Description And Analysis
In the foregoing chapters we have had several occasions to re...

Buddha-nature Is The Common Source Of Morals
Furthermore, Buddha-nature or real self, being the seat of lo...

Enlightened Consciousness
In addition to these considerations, which mainly depend on i...

Zen After The Restoration
After the Restoration of the Mei-ji (1867) the popularity of ...

The Five Ranks Of Merit
Thus far we have stated how to train our body and mind accord...

The Law Of Balance In Life
It is also the case with human affairs. Social positions hig...

Decline Of Zen
The blooming prosperity of Zen was over towards the end of th...

The Honest Poverty Of The Zen Monk And The Samurai
Secondly, the so-called honest poverty is a characteristic of...




How To Worship Buddha








The author of Vimalakirtti-nirdeca-sutra well explains our attitude
towards Buddha when he says: We ask Buddha for nothing. We ask
Dharma for nothing. We ask Samgha for nothing. Nothing we ask of
Buddha. No worldly success, no rewards in the future life, no
special blessing. Hwang Pah (O-baku) said: I simply worship Buddha.
I ask Buddha for nothing. I ask Dharma for nothing. I ask Samgha
for nothing. Then a prince[FN#159] questioned him: You ask Buddha
for nothing. You ask Dharma for nothing. You ask Samgha for nothing.
What, then, is the use of your worship? The Prince earned a slap
as an answer to his utilitarian question.[FN#160] This incident well
illustrates that worship, as understood by Zen masters, is a pure act
of thanksgiving, or the opening of the grateful heart; in other
words, the disclosing of Enlightened Consciousness. We are living
the very life of Buddha, enjoying His blessing, and holding communion
with Him through speech, thought, and action. The earth is not 'the
vale of tears,' but the glorious creation of Universal Spirit; nor
man 'the poor miserable sinner' but the living altar of Buddha
Himself. Whatever we do, we do with grateful heart and pure joy
sanctioned by Enlightened Consciousness; eating, drinking, talking,
walking, and every other work of our daily life are the worship and
devotion. We agree with Margaret Fuller when she says: Reverence
the highest; have patience with the lowest; let this day's
performance of the meanest duty be thy religion. Are the stars too
distant? Pick up the pebble that lies at thy feet, and from it learn
all.


[FN#159] Afterwards the Emperor Suen Tsung (Sen-so), of the Tang
dynasty.

[FN#160] For the details, see Heki-gan-shu.






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Previous: Our Conception Of Buddha Is Not Final



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