JACK SELLS THE COW ONCE upon a time there was a poor widow who lived in a little cottage with her only son Jack. Jack was a giddy, thoughtless boy, but very kind-hearted and affectionate. There had been a hard winter, and after it the poor... Read more of Jack And The Beanstalk at Children Stories.caInformational Site Network Informational
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Zen Under The Toku-gana Shogunate
Peace was at last restored by Iye-yasu, the founder of the To...

The Breathing Exercise Of The Yogi
Breathing exercise is one of the practices of Yoga, and somew...

The Theory Of Buddha-nature Adequately Explains The Ethical States Of Man
This theory of Buddha-nature enables us to get an insight int...

Buddha Dwelling In The Individual Mind
Enlightened Consciousness in the individual mind acquires for...

Enlightenment Is Beyond Description And Analysis
In the foregoing chapters we have had several occasions to re...

Buddha Is Unnamable
Give a definite name to Deity, He would be no more than what ...

The Progress And Hope Of Life
How many myriads of years have passed since the germs of life...

The Characteristics Of Do-gen The Founder Of The Japanese So To Sect
In the meantime seekers after a new truth gradually began to ...

Let Go Of Your Idle Thoughts
[FN#263] A famous Zenist, Mu-go-koku-shi, is said to ha...

No Need Of The Scriptural Authority For Zen
Some Occidental scholars erroneously identify Buddhism with t...

Do Thy Best And Leave The Rest To Providence
There is another point of view which enables us to enjoy life...

Zazen And The Forgetting Of Self
Zazen is a most effectual means of destroying selfishness, th...

Bodhidharma And His Successor The Second Patriarch
China was not, however, an uncultivated[FN#29] land for the s...

Man Is Both Good-natured And Bad-natured According To Yan Hiung
According to Yang Hiung and his followers, good is no less re...

The Beatitude Of Zen
We are far from denying, as already shown in the foregoing ch...

Epicureanism And Life
There are a good many people always buoyant in spirit and mir...

Nature Favours Nothing In Particular
There is another point of view of life, which gave the presen...

The Usual Explanation Of The Canon
An eminent Chinese Buddhist scholar, well known as Ten Dai Da...

Thing-in-itself Means Thing-knowerless
How, then, did philosophers come to consider reality to be un...

The Parable Of The Monk And The Stupid Woman
The confused or unenlightened may be compared with a monk and...

How To Worship Buddha

The author of Vimalakirtti-nirdeca-sutra well explains our attitude
towards Buddha when he says: We ask Buddha for nothing. We ask
Dharma for nothing. We ask Samgha for nothing. Nothing we ask of
Buddha. No worldly success, no rewards in the future life, no
special blessing. Hwang Pah (O-baku) said: I simply worship Buddha.
I ask Buddha for nothing. I ask Dharma for nothing. I ask Samgha
for nothing. Then a prince[FN#159] questioned him: You ask Buddha
for nothing. You ask Dharma for nothing. You ask Samgha for nothing.
What, then, is the use of your worship? The Prince earned a slap
as an answer to his utilitarian question.[FN#160] This incident well
illustrates that worship, as understood by Zen masters, is a pure act
of thanksgiving, or the opening of the grateful heart; in other
words, the disclosing of Enlightened Consciousness. We are living
the very life of Buddha, enjoying His blessing, and holding communion
with Him through speech, thought, and action. The earth is not 'the
vale of tears,' but the glorious creation of Universal Spirit; nor
man 'the poor miserable sinner' but the living altar of Buddha
Himself. Whatever we do, we do with grateful heart and pure joy
sanctioned by Enlightened Consciousness; eating, drinking, talking,
walking, and every other work of our daily life are the worship and
devotion. We agree with Margaret Fuller when she says: Reverence
the highest; have patience with the lowest; let this day's
performance of the meanest duty be thy religion. Are the stars too
distant? Pick up the pebble that lies at thy feet, and from it learn

[FN#159] Afterwards the Emperor Suen Tsung (Sen-so), of the Tang

[FN#160] For the details, see Heki-gan-shu.

Next: Man Is Good-natured According To Mencius

Previous: Our Conception Of Buddha Is Not Final

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