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Buddha-nature Is The Common Source Of Morals
Furthermore, Buddha-nature or real self, being the seat of lo...

The Examination Of The Notion Of Self
The belief in immortality is based on the strong instinct of ...

Nature Favours Nothing In Particular
There is another point of view of life, which gave the presen...

Thing-in-itself Means Thing-knowerless
How, then, did philosophers come to consider reality to be un...

Zazen Or The Sitting In Meditation
Habit comes out of practice, and forms character by degrees, ...

Do Thy Best And Leave The Rest To Providence
There is another point of view which enables us to enjoy life...

Three Important Elements Of Zen
To understand how Zen developed during some four hundred year...

The Parable Of A Drunkard
Now the question arises, If all human beings are endowed with...

The Application Of The Law Of Causation To Morals
Although it may be needless to state here the law of causatio...

Poetical Intuition And Zen
Since Universal Life or Spirit permeates the universe, the po...

The Law Of Balance
Nature governs the world with her law of balance. She puts t...

The Sermon Of The Inanimate
The Scripture of Zen is written with facts simple and familia...

Nature And Her Lesson
Nature offers us nectar and ambrosia every day, and everywher...

Pessimistic View Of The Ancient Hindus
In addition to this, the new theory of matter has entirely ov...

The First Step In The Mental Training
Some of the old Zen masters are said to have attained to supr...

Great Men And Nature
All great men, whether they be poets or scientists or religio...

Bodhidharma And His Successor The Second Patriarch
China was not, however, an uncultivated[FN#29] land for the s...

Calmness Of Mind
The Yogi breathing above mentioned is fit rather for physical...

Missionary Activity Of The Sixth Patriarch
As we have seen above, the Sixth Patriarch was a great genius...

Sutras Used By Zen Masters
Ten Dai failed to explain away the discrepancies and contradi...




Zen And Nirvana








The beatitude of Zen is Nirvana, not in the Hinayanistic sense of the
term, but in the sense peculiar to the faith. Nirvana literally
means extinction or annihilation; hence the extinction of life or the
annihilation of individuality. To Zen, however, it means the state
of extinction of pain and the annihilation of sin. Zen never looks
for the realization of its beatitude in a place like heaven, nor
believes in the realm of Reality transcendental of the phenomenal
universe, nor gives countenance to the superstition of Immortality,
nor does it hold the world is the best of all possible worlds, nor
conceives life simply as blessing. It is in this life, full of
shortcomings, misery, and sufferings, that Zen hopes to realize its
beatitude. It is in this world, imperfect, changing, and moving,
that Zen finds the Divine Light it worships. It is in this
phenomenal universe of limitation and relativity that Zen aims to
attain to highest Nirvana. We speak, says the author of
Vimalakirtti-nirdeca-sutra, of the transitoriness of body, but not
of the desire of the Nirvana or destruction of it. Paranirvana,
according to the author of Lankavatarasutra, is neither death nor
destruction, but bliss, freedom, and purity. Nirvana, says Kiai
Hwan,[FN#276] means the extinction of pain or the crossing over of
the sea of life and death. It denotes the real permanent state of
spiritual attainment. It does not signify destruction or
annihilation. It denotes the belief in the great root of life and
spirit. It is Nirvana of Zen to enjoy bliss for all sufferings of
life. It is Nirvana of Zen to be serene in mind for all disturbances
of actual existence. It is Nirvana of Zen to be in the conscious
union with Universal Life or Buddha through Enlightenment.


[FN#276] A commentator of Saddharma-pundarika-sutra.






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