Xlf.ca Home Samurai Code of Honor Courage Samuri Religion - History of Buddism

Buddhism

Buddha Dwelling In The Individual Mind
Enlightened Consciousness in the individual mind acquires for...

The Law Of Balance
Nature governs the world with her law of balance. She puts t...

Change As Seen By Zen
Zen, like Hinayanism, does not deny the doctrine of Transienc...

The Great Person And Small Person
For these reasons Zen proposes to call man Buddha-natured or ...

Difficulties Are No Match For The Optimist
How can we suppose that we, the children of Buddha, are put a...

Scripture Is No More Than Waste Paper
Zen is not based on any particular sutra, either of Mahaya...

Each Smile A Hymn Each Kindly Word A Prayer
The glorious sun of Buddha-nature shines in the zenith of Enl...

Thing-in-itself Means Thing-knowerless
How, then, did philosophers come to consider reality to be un...

The Development Of The Southern And Of The Northern School Of Zen
After the death of the Fifth Patriarch the venerable Shang Si...

The Beatitude Of Zen
We are far from denying, as already shown in the foregoing ch...

The Parable Of The Robber Kih
Chwang Tsz (So-shi) remarks in a humorous way to the followin...

Life Consists In Conflict
Life consists in conflict. So long as man remains a social a...

Enlightenment Is Beyond Description And Analysis
In the foregoing chapters we have had several occasions to re...

The Awakening Of The Innermost Wisdom
Having set ourselves free from the misconception of Self, nex...

Shakya Muni And The Prodigal Son
A great trouble with us is that we do not believe in half the...

The Creative Force Of Nature And Humanity
The innate tendency of self-preservation, which manifests its...

Origin Of Zen In India
To-day Zen as a living faith can be found in its pure form on...

The Third Step In The Mental Training
To be the lord of mind is more essential to Enlightenment, wh...

Zazen Or The Sitting In Meditation
Habit comes out of practice, and forms character by degrees, ...

Zen And Nirvana
The beatitude of Zen is Nirvana, not in the Hinayanistic sens...




Buddha Is Unnamable








Give a definite name to Deity, He would be no more than what the name
implies. The Deity under the name of Brahman necessarily differs
from the Being under the appellation of Jehovah, just as the Hindu
differs from the Jew. In like manner the Being designated by God
necessarily differs from One named Amitabha or from Him entitled
Allah. To give a name to the Deity is to give Him tradition,
nationality, limitation, and fixity, and it never brings us nearer to
Him. Zen's object of worship cannot be named and determined as God,
or Brahman, or Amitabha, or Creator, or Nature, or Reality, or
Substance, or the like. Neither Chinese nor Japanese masters of Zen
tried to give a definite name to their object of adoration. They now
called Him That One, now This One, now Mind, now Buddha, now
Tathagata, now Certain Thing, now the True, now Dharma-nature, now
Buddha-nature, and so forth. Tung Shan (To-zan) on a certain
occasion declared it to be "A Certain Thing that pillars heaven above
and supports the earth below; dark as lacquer and undefinable;
manifesting itself through its activities, yet not wholly comprisable
within them." So-kei expressed it in the same wise: "There
exists a Certain Thing, bright as a mirror, spiritual as a mind, not
subjected to growth nor to decay." Huen Sha (Gen-sha) comparing it
with a gem says: "There exists a bright gem illuminating through the
worlds in ten directions by its light."


Tung Shan Luh (To-zan-roku, 'Sayings and Doings of Ta-zan')
is one of the best Zen books.

So-kei, a Korean Zenist, whose work entitled Zen-ke-ki-kwan
is worthy of our note as a representation of Korean Zen.

Sho-bo-gen-zo.


This certain thing or being is too sublime to be named after a
traditional or a national deity, too spiritual to be symbolized by
human art, too full of life to be formulated in terms of mechanical
science, too free to be rationalized by intellectual philosophy, too
universal to be perceived by bodily senses; but everybody can feel
its irresistible power, see its invisible presence, and touch its
heart and soul within himself. "This mysterious Mind," says Kwei
Fung (Kei-ho), "is higher than the highest, deeper than the deepest,
limitless in all directions. There is no centre in it. No
distinction of east and west, and above and below. Is it empty?
Yes, but not empty like space. Has it a form? Yes, but has no form
dependent on another for its existence. Is it intelligent? Yes, but
not intelligent like your mind. Is it non-intelligent? Yes, but not
non-intelligent like trees and stone. Is it conscious? Yes, but not
conscious like you when waking. Is it bright? Yes, but not bright
like the sun or the moon." To the question, "What and who is
Buddha?" Yuen Wu (En-go) replied: "Hold your tongue: the mouth is
the gate of evils!" while Pao Fuh (Ho-fuku) answered to the same
question: "No skill of art can picture Him." Thus Buddha is
unnamable, indescribable, and indefinable, but we provisionally call
Him Buddha.






Next: Buddha The Universal Life

Previous: Zen Is Iconoclastic



Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
ADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 1894