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Buddhism

The Ten Pictures Of The Cowherd
The pictures were drawn by Kwoh Ngan (Kaku-an), a Chinese...

The Awakening Of The Innermost Wisdom
Having set ourselves free from the misconception of Self, nex...

The Parable Of The Monk And The Stupid Woman
The confused or unenlightened may be compared with a monk and...

Do Thy Best And Leave The Rest To Providence
There is another point of view which enables us to enjoy life...

An Illusion Concerning Appearance And Reality
To get Enlightened we must next dispel an illusion respecting...

Where Then Does The Error Lie?
Where, then, does the error lie in the four possible proposit...

Zen Is Not Nihilistic
Zen judged from ancient Zen masters' aphorisms may seem, at t...

Man Is Good-natured According To Mencius
Oriental scholars, especially the Chinese men of letters, see...

The Beatitude Of Zen
We are far from denying, as already shown in the foregoing ch...

Man Is Both Good-natured And Bad-natured According To Yan Hiung Yo-yu
According to Yang Hiung and his followers, good is no less re...

The Honest Poverty Of The Zen Monk And The Samurai
Secondly, the so-called honest poverty is a characteristic of...

Difficulties Are No Match For The Optimist
How can we suppose that we, the children of Buddha, are put a...

Hinayanism And Its Doctrine
The doctrine of Transience was the first entrance gate of Hin...

Enlightened Consciousness
In addition to these considerations, which mainly depend on i...

Idealism Is A Potent Medicine For Self-created Mental Disease
In so far as Buddhist idealism refers to the world of sense, ...

Nature Favours Nothing In Particular
There is another point of view of life, which gave the presen...

The Absolute And Reality Are But An Abstraction
A grain of sand you, trample upon has a deeper significance t...

The Errors Of Philosophical Pessimists And Religious Optimists
Philosophical pessimists maintain that there are on earth ma...

Bodhidharma And His Successor The Second Patriarch
China was not, however, an uncultivated land for the seed of ...

The Courage And The Composure Of Mind Of The Zen Monk And Of The Samurai
Fourthly, our Samurai encountered death, as is well known, wi...




How To Worship Buddha








The author of Vimalakirtti-nirdeca-sutra well explains our attitude
towards Buddha when he says: "We ask Buddha for nothing. We ask
Dharma for nothing. We ask Samgha for nothing." Nothing we ask of
Buddha. No worldly success, no rewards in the future life, no
special blessing. Hwang Pah (O-baku) said: "I simply worship Buddha.
I ask Buddha for nothing. I ask Dharma for nothing. I ask Samgha
for nothing." Then a prince questioned him: "You ask Buddha
for nothing. You ask Dharma for nothing. You ask Samgha for nothing.
What, then, is the use of your worship?" The Prince earned a slap
as an answer to his utilitarian question. This incident well
illustrates that worship, as understood by Zen masters, is a pure act
of thanksgiving, or the opening of the grateful heart; in other
words, the disclosing of Enlightened Consciousness. We are living
the very life of Buddha, enjoying His blessing, and holding communion
with Him through speech, thought, and action. The earth is not 'the
vale of tears,' but the glorious creation of Universal Spirit; nor
man 'the poor miserable sinner' but the living altar of Buddha
Himself. Whatever we do, we do with grateful heart and pure joy
sanctioned by Enlightened Consciousness; eating, drinking, talking,
walking, and every other work of our daily life are the worship and
devotion. We agree with Margaret Fuller when she says: "Reverence
the highest; have patience with the lowest; let this day's
performance of the meanest duty be thy religion. Are the stars too
distant? Pick up the pebble that lies at thy feet, and from it learn
all."


Afterwards the Emperor Suen Tsung (Sen-so), of the Tang
dynasty.

For the details, see Heki-gan-shu.






Next: Man Is Good-natured According To Mencius

Previous: Our Conception Of Buddha Is Not Final



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