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Life In The Concrete
Life in the concrete, which we are living, greatly differs fr...

The Four Alternatives And The Five Categories
There are, according to Zen, the four classes of religious an...

Zen After The Downfall Of The Ho-jo Regency
Towards the end of the Ho-Jo period, and after the downfall o...

A Sutra Equal In Size To The Whole World
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The Disciples Under The Sixth Patriarch
Some time after this the Sixth Patriarch settled himself down...

The Ten Pictures Of The Cowherd
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Bodhidharma And The Emperor Wu
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The Theory Of Buddha-nature Adequately Explains The Ethical States Of Man
This theory of Buddha-nature enables us to get an insight int...

There Is No Mortal Who Is Non-moral Or Purely Immoral
The same is the case with the third and the fourth class of p...

Enlightenment Implies An Insight Into The Nature Of Self
We cannot pass over, however, this weighty problem without sa...

Everything Is Living According To Zen
Everything alive has a strong innate tendency to preserve its...

Universal Life Is Universal Spirit
These considerations naturally lead us to see that Universal ...

Poetical Intuition And Zen
Since Universal Life or Spirit permeates the universe, the po...

The Second And The Third Patriarchs
After the death of the First Patriarch, in A.D. 528, Hwui Ko ...

Introduction Of Zen Into China By Bodhidharma
An epoch-making event took place in the Buddhist history of C...

Man Is Good-natured According To Mencius
Oriental scholars, especially the Chinese men of letters, see...

The Fifth And The Sixth Patriarchs
Tao Sin transmitted the Law to Hung Jan (Ko-nin), who being e...

Zen And Supernatural Power
Yoga claims that various supernatural powers can be acquired ...

Zen And Nirvana
The beatitude of Zen is Nirvana, not in the Hinayanistic sens...

The Awakening Of The Innermost Wisdom
Having set ourselves free from the misconception of Self, nex...




Man Is Good-natured According To Mencius








Oriental scholars, especially the Chinese men of letters, seem to
have taken so keen an interest in the study of human nature that they
proposed all the possible opinions respecting the subject in
question-namely, (1) man is good-natured; (2) man is bad-natured; (3)
man is good-natured and bad-natured as well; (4) man is neither
good-natured nor bad-natured. The first of these opinions was
proposed by a most reputed Confucianist scholar, Mencius, and his
followers, and is still adhered to by the majority of the Japanese
and the Chinese Confucianists. Mencius thought it as natural for man
to do good as it is for the grass to be green. 'Suppose a person has
happened,' he would say, 'to find a child on the point of tumbling
down into a deep well. He would rescue it even at the risk of his
life, no matter how morally degenerated he might be. He would have
no time to consider that his act might bring him some reward from its
parents, or a good reputation among his friends and fellow-citizens.
He would do it barely out of his inborn good-nature.' After
enumerating some instances similar to this one, Mencius concludes
that goodness is the fundamental nature of man, even if he is often
carried away by his brutal disposition.


Mencius (372-282 B.C.) is regarded as the best expounder of
the doctrine of Confucius. There exists a well-known work of his,
entitled after his own name. See 'A History of Chinese Philosophy,'
by R. Endo, and also 'A History of Chinese Philosophy' (pp. 38-50),
by G. Nakauchi.






Next: Man Is Bad-natured According To Siun Tsz Jun-shi

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