In the year 1676, about the 13th or 14th of this Month October, in the Night, between one and two of the Clock, this _Jesch Claes_, a cripple, being in bed with her Husband, who was a Boatman, she was three times pulled by her Arm, with wh... Read more of The Miraculous Case Of Jesch Claes at Scary Stories.caInformational Site Network Informational
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Buddhism

Wang Yang Ming O-yo-mei And A Thief
One evening when Wang was giving a lecture to a number of stu...

The Law Of Balance In Life
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Bodhidharma And The Emperor Wu
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The Breathing Exercise Of The Yogi
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Poetical Intuition And Zen
Since Universal Life or Spirit permeates the universe, the po...

The Resemblance Of The Zen Monk To The Samurai
Let us point out in brief the similarities between Zen and Ja...

The Betterment Of Life
Again, people nowadays seem to feel keenly the wound of the ...

Three Important Elements Of Zen
To understand how Zen developed during some four hundred year...

The Examination Of The Notion Of Self
The belief in immortality is based on the strong instinct of ...

An Illusion Concerning Appearance And Reality
To get Enlightened we must next dispel an illusion respecting...

Scripture Is No More Than Waste Paper
Zen is not based on any particular sutra, either of Mahaya...

Nature Favours Nothing In Particular
There is another point of view of life, which gave the presen...

Bodhidharma's Disciples And The Transmission Of The Law
For details, see Chwen Tang Luh and Den Ka Roku, by Kei Z...

The Law Of Balance
Nature governs the world with her law of balance. She puts t...

Universal Life Is Universal Spirit
These considerations naturally lead us to see that Universal ...

Personalism Of B P Bowne
B. P. Bowne says: They (phenomena) are not phantoms or illus...

Man Is Both Good-natured And Bad-natured According To Yan Hiung Yo-yu
According to Yang Hiung and his followers, good is no less re...

Difficulties Are No Match For The Optimist
How can we suppose that we, the children of Buddha, are put a...

The Spiritual Attainment Of The Sixth Patriarch
Some time before his death (in 675 A.D.) the Fifth Patriarch ...

Change As Seen By Zen
Zen, like Hinayanism, does not deny the doctrine of Transienc...




Pessimistic View Of The Ancient Hindus








In addition to this, the new theory of matter has entirely over
thrown the old conception of the unchanging atoms, and they are now
regarded to be composed of magnetic forces, ions, and corpuscles in
incessant motion. Therefore we have no inert matter in the concrete,
no unchanging thing in the sphere of experience, no constant organism
in the transient universe. These considerations often led many
thinkers, ancient and modern, to the pessimistic view of life. What
is the use of your exertion, they would say, in accumulating wealth,
which is doomed to melt away in the twinkling of an eye? What is the
use of your striving after power, which is more short-lived than a
bubble? What is the use of your endeavour in the reformation of
society, which does not endure any longer than the castle in the air?
How do kings differ from beggars in the eye of Transience? How do
the rich differ from the poor, how the beautiful from the ugly, bow
the young from the old, how the good from the evil, how the lucky
from the unlucky, how the wise from the unwise, in the court of
Death? Vain is ambition. Vain is fame. Vain is pleasure. Vain are
struggles and efforts. All is in vain. An ancient Hindu
thinker says:

"O saint, what is the use of the enjoyment of pleasures in this
offensive, pithless body--a mere mass of bones, skins, sinews,
marrow, and flesh? What is the use of the enjoyment of pleasures in
this body, which is assailed by lust, hatred, greed, delusion, fear,
anguish, jealousy, separation from what is loved, union with what is
not loved, hunger, old age, death, illness, grief, and other evils?
In such a world as this, what is the use of the enjoyment of
pleasures, if he who has fed on them is to return to this world again
and again? In this world I am like a frog in a dry well."


Maitrayana Upanisad.


It is this consideration on the transitoriness of life that led some
Taoist in China to prefer death to life, as expressed in Chwang Tsz
(Su-shi):

"When Kwang-zze went to Khu, he saw an empty skull, bleached indeed,
but still retaining its shape. Tapping it with his horse-switch, he
asked it saying: 'Did you, sir, in your greed of life, fail in the
lessons of reason and come to this? Or did you do so, in the service
of a perishing state, by the punishment of an axe? Or was it through
your evil conduct, reflecting disgrace on your parents and on your
wife and children? Or was it through your hard endurances of cold
and hunger? Or was it that you had completed your term of life?'

"Having given expression to these questions, he took up the skull and
made a pillow of it, and went to sleep. At midnight the skull
appeared to him in a dream, and said: 'What you said to me was after
the fashion of an orator. All your words were about the
entanglements of men in their lifetime. There are none of those
things after death. Would you like to hear me, sir, tell you about
death?' 'I should,' said Kwang-zze, and the skull resumed: 'In death
there are not (the distinctions of) ruler above minister below.
There are none of the phenomena of the four seasons. Tranquil and at
ease, our years are those of heaven and earth. No king in his court
has greater enjoyment than we have.' Kwang-zze did not believe it,
and said: 'If I could get the Ruler of our Destiny to restore your
body to life with its bones and flesh and skin, and to give you back
your father and mother, your wife and children, and all your village
acquaintances, would you wish me to do so?' The skull stared fixedly
at him, and knitted its brows and said: 'How should I cast away the
enjoyment of my royal court, and undertake again the toils of life
among mankind?'"


'Chwang Tsz,' vol. vi., p. 23.






Next: Hinayanism And Its Doctrine

Previous: Life And Change



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