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Nature Is The Mother Of All Things
Furthermore, man has come into existence out of Nature. He i...

Three Important Elements Of Zen
To understand how Zen developed during some four hundred year...

Sutras Used By Zen Masters
Ten Dai failed to explain away the discrepancies and contradi...

Personalism Of B P Bowne
B. P. Bowne says: They (phenomena) are not phantoms or illus...

A Sutra Equal In Size To The Whole World
The holy writ that Zen masters admire is not one of parchment...

The Usual Explanation Of The Canon
An eminent Chinese Buddhist scholar, well known as Ten Dai Da...

Bodhidharma And The Emperor Wu
No sooner had Bodhidharma landed at Kwang Cheu in Southern Ch...

Life Change And Hope
The doctrine of Transcience never drives us to the pessimisti...

Wang Yang Ming O-yo-mei And A Thief
One evening when Wang was giving a lecture to a number of stu...

Zen And Nirvana
The beatitude of Zen is Nirvana, not in the Hinayanistic sens...

Nature And Her Lesson
Nature offers us nectar and ambrosia every day, and everywher...

Thing-in-itself Means Thing-knowerless
How, then, did philosophers come to consider reality to be un...

The Disciples Under The Sixth Patriarch
Some time after this the Sixth Patriarch settled himself down...

The Courage And The Composure Of Mind Of The Zen Monk And Of The Samurai
Fourthly, our Samurai encountered death, as is well known, wi...

Great Men And Nature
All great men, whether they be poets or scientists or religio...

The Errors Of Philosophical Pessimists And Religious Optimists
Philosophical pessimists maintain that there are on earth ma...

The Fifth And The Sixth Patriarchs
Tao Sin transmitted the Law to Hung Jan (Ko-nin), who being e...

The Development Of The Southern And Of The Northern School Of Zen
After the death of the Fifth Patriarch the venerable Shang Si...

Shakya Muni And The Prodigal Son
A great trouble with us is that we do not believe in half the...

Hinayanism And Its Doctrine
The doctrine of Transience was the first entrance gate of Hin...




The Breathing Exercise Of The Yogi








Breathing exercise is one of the practices of Yoga, and somewhat
similar in its method and end to those of Zen. We quote here
Yogi Ramacharaka to show how modern Yogis practise it: "(1) Stand or
sit erect. Breathing through the nostrils, inhale steadily, first
filling the lower part of the lungs, which is accomplished by
bringing into play the diaphragm, which, descending, exerts a gentle
pressure on the abdominal organs, pushing forward the front walls of
the abdomen. Then fill the middle part of the lungs, pushing out the
lower ribs, breastbone, and chest. Then fill the higher portion of
the lungs, protruding the upper chest, thus lifting the chest,
including the upper six or seven pairs of ribs. In the final
movement the lower part of the abdomen will be slightly drawn in,
which movement gives the lungs a support, and also helps to fill the
highest part of the lungs. At the first reading it may appear that
this breath consists of three distinct movements. This, however, is
not the correct idea. The inhalation is continuous, the entire chest
cavity from the lower diaphragm to the highest point of the chest in
the region of the collar-bone being expanded with a uniform movement.
Avoid a jerking series of inhalations, and strive to attain a
steady, continuous action. Practice will soon overcome the tendency
to divide the inhalation into three movements, and will result in a
uniform continuous breath. You will be able to complete the
inhalation in a couple of seconds after a little practice. (2)
Retain the breath a few seconds. (3) Exhale quite slowly, holding
the chest in a firm position, and drawing the abdomen in a little and
lifting it upward slowly as the air leaves the lungs. When the air
is entirely exhaled, relax the chest and abdomen. A little practice
will render this part of exercise easy, and the movement once
acquired will be afterwards performed almost automatically."


Hatha Yoga, pp. 112, 113.






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