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The Establishment Of The Rin Zai School Of Zen In Japan
The Lin Tsi school was started by Nan Yoh, a prominent d...

Zen Is Not Nihilistic
Zen judged from ancient Zen masters' aphorisms may seem, at t...

The Third Step In The Mental Training
To be the lord of mind is more essential to Enlightenment, wh...

Thing-in-itself Means Thing-knowerless
How, then, did philosophers come to consider reality to be un...

The Parable Of The Robber Kih
Chwang Tsz (So-shi) remarks in a humorous way to the followin...

The Social State Of Japan When Zen Was Established By Ei-sai And Do-gen
Now we have to observe the condition of the country when Zen ...

The Absolute And Reality Are But An Abstraction
A grain of sand you, trample upon has a deeper significance t...

There Is No Mortal Who Is Purely Moral
By nature man should be either good or bad; or he should be g...

Man Is Neither Good-natured Nor Bad-natured According To Su Shi
(So-shoku). The difficulty may be avoided by a theory given ...

The Parable Of A Drunkard
Now the question arises, If all human beings are endowed with...

Buddha Is Unnamable
Give a definite name to Deity, He would be no more than what ...

Decline Of Zen
The blooming prosperity of Zen was over towards the end of th...

There Is No Mortal Who Is Non-moral Or Purely Immoral
The same is the case with the third and the fourth class of p...

The Eternal Life As Taught By Professor Munsterberg
Some philosophical pessimists undervalue life simply because ...

Life And Change
Transformation and change are the essential features of life;...

Universal Life Is Universal Spirit
These considerations naturally lead us to see that Universal ...

The Application Of The Law Of Causation To Morals
Although it may be needless to state here the law of causatio...

The Examination Of The Notion Of Self
The belief in immortality is based on the strong instinct of ...

Calmness Of Mind
The Yogi breathing above mentioned is fit rather for physical...

A Sutra Equal In Size To The Whole World
The holy writ that Zen masters admire is not one of parchment...




The Breathing Exercise Of The Yogi








Breathing exercise is one of the practices of Yoga, and somewhat
similar in its method and end to those of Zen. We quote here
Yogi Ramacharaka to show how modern Yogis practise it: "(1) Stand or
sit erect. Breathing through the nostrils, inhale steadily, first
filling the lower part of the lungs, which is accomplished by
bringing into play the diaphragm, which, descending, exerts a gentle
pressure on the abdominal organs, pushing forward the front walls of
the abdomen. Then fill the middle part of the lungs, pushing out the
lower ribs, breastbone, and chest. Then fill the higher portion of
the lungs, protruding the upper chest, thus lifting the chest,
including the upper six or seven pairs of ribs. In the final
movement the lower part of the abdomen will be slightly drawn in,
which movement gives the lungs a support, and also helps to fill the
highest part of the lungs. At the first reading it may appear that
this breath consists of three distinct movements. This, however, is
not the correct idea. The inhalation is continuous, the entire chest
cavity from the lower diaphragm to the highest point of the chest in
the region of the collar-bone being expanded with a uniform movement.
Avoid a jerking series of inhalations, and strive to attain a
steady, continuous action. Practice will soon overcome the tendency
to divide the inhalation into three movements, and will result in a
uniform continuous breath. You will be able to complete the
inhalation in a couple of seconds after a little practice. (2)
Retain the breath a few seconds. (3) Exhale quite slowly, holding
the chest in a firm position, and drawing the abdomen in a little and
lifting it upward slowly as the air leaves the lungs. When the air
is entirely exhaled, relax the chest and abdomen. A little practice
will render this part of exercise easy, and the movement once
acquired will be afterwards performed almost automatically."


Hatha Yoga, pp. 112, 113.






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