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Buddhism

Introduction Of Zen Into China By Bodhidharma
An epoch-making event took place in the Buddhist history of C...

The First Step In The Mental Training
Some of the old Zen masters are said to have attained to supr...

Buddha Is Unnamable
Give a definite name to Deity, He would be no more than what ...

The Application Of The Law Of Causation To Morals
Although it may be needless to state here the law of causatio...

The Theory Of Buddha-nature Adequately Explains The Ethical States Of Man
This theory of Buddha-nature enables us to get an insight int...

Everything Is Living According To Zen
Everything alive has a strong innate tendency to preserve its...

The Characteristics Of Do-gen The Founder Of The Japanese So To Sect
In the meantime seekers after a new truth gradually began to ...

Nature And Her Lesson
Nature offers us nectar and ambrosia every day, and everywher...

The Law Of Balance
Nature governs the world with her law of balance. She puts t...

Buddha-nature Is The Common Source Of Morals
Furthermore, Buddha-nature or real self, being the seat of lo...

The Method Of Instruction Adopted By Zen Masters
Thus far we have described the doctrine of Zen inculcated by ...

Zen And Nirvana
The beatitude of Zen is Nirvana, not in the Hinayanistic sens...

Life Change And Hope
The doctrine of Transcience never drives us to the pessimisti...

Shakya Muni And The Prodigal Son
A great trouble with us is that we do not believe in half the...

The Disciples Under The Sixth Patriarch
Some time after this the Sixth Patriarch settled himself down...

Change As Seen By Zen
Zen, like Hinayanism, does not deny the doctrine of Transienc...

The Establishment Of The Rin Zai School Of Zen In Japan
The Lin Tsi school was started by Nan Yoh, a prominent d...

Let Go Of Your Idle Thoughts
A famous Zenist, Mu-go-koku-shi, is said to have replied ...

Zen In The Dark Age
The latter half of the Ashikaga period was the age of arms an...

Thing-in-itself Means Thing-knowerless
How, then, did philosophers come to consider reality to be un...




The Second And The Third Patriarchs








After the death of the First Patriarch, in A.D. 528, Hwui Ko did his
best to propagate the new faith over sixty years. On one occasion a
man suffering from some chronic disease called on him, and requested
him in earnest: "Pray, Reverend Sir, be my confessor and grant me
absolution, for I suffer long from an incurable disease." "Bring out
your sin (if there be such a thing as sin)," replied the Second
Patriarch, "here before me. I shall grant you absolution." "It is
impossible," said the man after a short consideration, "to seek out
my sin." "Then," exclaimed the master, "I have absolved you.
Henceforth live up to Buddha, Dharma, and Samgha." "I know,
your reverence," said the man, "that you belong to Samgha; but what
are Buddha and Dharma?" "Buddha is Mind itself. Mind itself is
Dharma. Buddha is identical with Dharma. So is Samgha." "Then I
understand," replied the man, "there is no such thing as sin within
my body nor without it, nor anywhere else. Mind is beyond and above
sin. It is no other than Buddha and Dharma." Thereupon the Second
Patriarch saw the man was well qualified to be taught in the new
faith, and converted him, giving him the name of Sang Tsung (So-san).
After two years' instruction and discipline, he bestowed on
Sang Tsung the Kachaya handed down from Bodhidharma, and authorized
him as the Third Patriarch. It is by Sang Tsung that the doctrine of
Zen was first reduced to writing by his composition of Sin Sin
Ming (Sin zin-mei, On Faith and Mind), a metrical exposition of the
faith.


The so-called Three Treasures of the Buddha, the Law, and
the Order.

The Second Patriarch died in A.D. 593--that is, sixty-five
years after the departure of the First Patriarch.

A good many commentaries were written on the book, and it is
considered as one of the best books on Zen.






Next: The Fourth Patriarch And The Emperor Tai Tsung Tai-so

Previous: Bodhidharma's Disciples And The Transmission Of The Law



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