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Buddhism

Life And Change
A peculiar phase of life is change which appears in the form ...

Zazen And The Forgetting Of Self
Zazen is a most effectual means of destroying selfishness, th...

The Fifth And The Sixth Patriarchs
Tao Sin transmitted the Law to Hung Jan (Ko-nin), who being e...

The Creative Force Of Nature And Humanity
The innate tendency of self-preservation, which manifests its...

Everything Is Living According To Zen
Everything alive has a strong innate tendency to preserve its...

Great Men And Nature
All great men, whether they be poets or scientists or religio...

Bodhidharma's Disciples And The Transmission Of The Law
For details, see Chwen Tang Luh and Den Ka Roku, by Kei Z...

Buddha Is Unnamable
Give a definite name to Deity, He would be no more than what ...

The Great Person And Small Person
For these reasons Zen proposes to call man Buddha-natured or ...

Pessimistic View Of The Ancient Hindus
In addition to this, the new theory of matter has entirely ov...

Life Change And Hope
The doctrine of Transcience never drives us to the pessimisti...

Where Does The Root Of The Illusion Lie?
Now let us examine where illusion lies hidden from the view o...

Zen And Nirvana
The beatitude of Zen is Nirvana, not in the Hinayanistic sens...

Each Smile A Hymn Each Kindly Word A Prayer
The glorious sun of Buddha-nature shines in the zenith of Enl...

Man Is Not Good-natured Nor Bad-natured But Buddha-natured
We have had already occasion to observe that Zen teaches Bud...

Three Important Elements Of Zen
To understand how Zen developed during some four hundred year...

Nature Is The Mother Of All Things
Furthermore, man has come into existence out of Nature. He i...

Flight Of The Sixth Patriarch
On the following morning the news of what had happened during...

Epicureanism And Life
There are a good many people always buoyant in spirit and mir...

The Errors Of Philosophical Pessimists And Religious Optimists
Philosophical pessimists maintain that there are on earth ma...




Zen And Nirvana








The beatitude of Zen is Nirvana, not in the Hinayanistic sense of the
term, but in the sense peculiar to the faith. Nirvana literally
means extinction or annihilation; hence the extinction of life or the
annihilation of individuality. To Zen, however, it means the state
of extinction of pain and the annihilation of sin. Zen never looks
for the realization of its beatitude in a place like heaven, nor
believes in the realm of Reality transcendental of the phenomenal
universe, nor gives countenance to the superstition of Immortality,
nor does it hold the world is the best of all possible worlds, nor
conceives life simply as blessing. It is in this life, full of
shortcomings, misery, and sufferings, that Zen hopes to realize its
beatitude. It is in this world, imperfect, changing, and moving,
that Zen finds the Divine Light it worships. It is in this
phenomenal universe of limitation and relativity that Zen aims to
attain to highest Nirvana. "We speak," says the author of
Vimalakirtti-nirdeca-sutra, "of the transitoriness of body, but not
of the desire of the Nirvana or destruction of it." "Paranirvana,"
according to the author of Lankavatarasutra, "is neither death nor
destruction, but bliss, freedom, and purity." "Nirvana," says Kiai
Hwan, "means the extinction of pain or the crossing over of
the sea of life and death. It denotes the real permanent state of
spiritual attainment. It does not signify destruction or
annihilation. It denotes the belief in the great root of life and
spirit." It is Nirvana of Zen to enjoy bliss for all sufferings of
life. It is Nirvana of Zen to be serene in mind for all disturbances
of actual existence. It is Nirvana of Zen to be in the conscious
union with Universal Life or Buddha through Enlightenment.


A commentator of Saddharma-pundarika-sutra.






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