Xlf.ca Home Samurai Code of Honor Courage Samuri Religion - History of Buddism

Buddhism

Zen After The Restoration
After the Restoration of the Mei-ji (1867) the popularity of ...

Buddha Is Unnamable
Give a definite name to Deity, He would be no more than what ...

The Third Step In The Mental Training
To be the lord of mind is more essential to Enlightenment, wh...

The Parable Of The Robber Kih
Chwang Tsz (So-shi) remarks in a humorous way to the followin...

Man Is Neither Good-natured Nor Bad-natured According To Su Shi
(So-shoku). The difficulty may be avoided by a theory given ...

Do Thy Best And Leave The Rest To Providence
There is another point of view which enables us to enjoy life...

Zen Is Iconoclastic
For the followers of Bodhidharma, however, this conception of...

Zen Is Not Nihilistic
Zen judged from ancient Zen masters' aphorisms may seem, at t...

The Fourth Patriarch And The Emperor Tai Tsung Tai-so
The Third Patriarch was succeeded by Tao Sin (Do-shin), who ...

The Application Of The Law Of Causation To Morals
Although it may be needless to state here the law of causatio...

How To Worship Buddha
The author of Vimalakirtti-nirdeca-sutra well explains our at...

The Theory Of Buddha-nature Adequately Explains The Ethical States Of Man
This theory of Buddha-nature enables us to get an insight int...

Idealistic Scepticism Concerning Religion And Morality
Similarly, it is the case with religion and morality. If we ...

Bodhidharma And The Emperor Wu
No sooner had Bodhidharma landed at Kwang Cheu in Southern Ch...

The Manliness Of The Zen Monk And Of The Samurai
Thirdly, both the Zen monk and the Samurai were distinguished...

The Second And The Third Patriarchs
After the death of the First Patriarch, in A.D. 528, Hwui Ko ...

The Fifth And The Sixth Patriarchs
Tao Sin transmitted the Law to Hung Jan (Ko-nin), who being e...

Decline Of Zen
The blooming prosperity of Zen was over towards the end of th...

Missionary Activity Of The Sixth Patriarch
As we have seen above, the Sixth Patriarch was a great genius...

Sutras Used By Zen Masters
Ten Dai failed to explain away the discrepancies and contradi...




Zen And Nirvana








The beatitude of Zen is Nirvana, not in the Hinayanistic sense of the
term, but in the sense peculiar to the faith. Nirvana literally
means extinction or annihilation; hence the extinction of life or the
annihilation of individuality. To Zen, however, it means the state
of extinction of pain and the annihilation of sin. Zen never looks
for the realization of its beatitude in a place like heaven, nor
believes in the realm of Reality transcendental of the phenomenal
universe, nor gives countenance to the superstition of Immortality,
nor does it hold the world is the best of all possible worlds, nor
conceives life simply as blessing. It is in this life, full of
shortcomings, misery, and sufferings, that Zen hopes to realize its
beatitude. It is in this world, imperfect, changing, and moving,
that Zen finds the Divine Light it worships. It is in this
phenomenal universe of limitation and relativity that Zen aims to
attain to highest Nirvana. "We speak," says the author of
Vimalakirtti-nirdeca-sutra, "of the transitoriness of body, but not
of the desire of the Nirvana or destruction of it." "Paranirvana,"
according to the author of Lankavatarasutra, "is neither death nor
destruction, but bliss, freedom, and purity." "Nirvana," says Kiai
Hwan, "means the extinction of pain or the crossing over of
the sea of life and death. It denotes the real permanent state of
spiritual attainment. It does not signify destruction or
annihilation. It denotes the belief in the great root of life and
spirit." It is Nirvana of Zen to enjoy bliss for all sufferings of
life. It is Nirvana of Zen to be serene in mind for all disturbances
of actual existence. It is Nirvana of Zen to be in the conscious
union with Universal Life or Buddha through Enlightenment.


A commentator of Saddharma-pundarika-sutra.






Next: Nature And Her Lesson

Previous: The Ten Pictures Of The Cowherd



Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
ADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 2345