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Buddhism

Zen And Nirvana
The beatitude of Zen is Nirvana, not in the Hinayanistic sens...

Man Is Not Good-natured Nor Bad-natured But Buddha-natured
We have had already occasion to observe that Zen teaches Bud...

The Five Ranks Of Merit
Thus far we have stated how to train our body and mind accord...

Buddha Is Unnamable
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Buddha The Universal Life
Zen conceives Buddha as a Being, who moves, stirs, inspires, ...

Poetical Intuition And Zen
Since Universal Life or Spirit permeates the universe, the po...

Zen Under The Toku-gana Shogunate
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The Law Of Balance
Nature governs the world with her law of balance. She puts t...

The Awakening Of The Innermost Wisdom
Having set ourselves free from the misconception of Self, nex...

Personalism Of B P Bowne
B. P. Bowne says: They (phenomena) are not phantoms or illus...

Real Self
If there be no individual soul either in mind or body, where ...

The Breathing Exercise Of The Yogi
Breathing exercise is one of the practices of Yoga, and somew...

The Second And The Third Patriarchs
After the death of the First Patriarch, in A.D. 528, Hwui Ko ...

Zazen Or The Sitting In Meditation
Habit comes out of practice, and forms character by degrees, ...

A Sutra Equal In Size To The Whole World
The holy writ that Zen masters admire is not one of parchment...

Nature Is The Mother Of All Things
Furthermore, man has come into existence out of Nature. He i...

Sutras Used By Zen Masters
Ten Dai failed to explain away the discrepancies and contradi...

The Disciples Under The Sixth Patriarch
Some time after this the Sixth Patriarch settled himself down...

Life And Change
A peculiar phase of life is change which appears in the form ...

Enlightenment Implies An Insight Into The Nature Of Self
We cannot pass over, however, this weighty problem without sa...




Zen And Nirvana








The beatitude of Zen is Nirvana, not in the Hinayanistic sense of the
term, but in the sense peculiar to the faith. Nirvana literally
means extinction or annihilation; hence the extinction of life or the
annihilation of individuality. To Zen, however, it means the state
of extinction of pain and the annihilation of sin. Zen never looks
for the realization of its beatitude in a place like heaven, nor
believes in the realm of Reality transcendental of the phenomenal
universe, nor gives countenance to the superstition of Immortality,
nor does it hold the world is the best of all possible worlds, nor
conceives life simply as blessing. It is in this life, full of
shortcomings, misery, and sufferings, that Zen hopes to realize its
beatitude. It is in this world, imperfect, changing, and moving,
that Zen finds the Divine Light it worships. It is in this
phenomenal universe of limitation and relativity that Zen aims to
attain to highest Nirvana. "We speak," says the author of
Vimalakirtti-nirdeca-sutra, "of the transitoriness of body, but not
of the desire of the Nirvana or destruction of it." "Paranirvana,"
according to the author of Lankavatarasutra, "is neither death nor
destruction, but bliss, freedom, and purity." "Nirvana," says Kiai
Hwan, "means the extinction of pain or the crossing over of
the sea of life and death. It denotes the real permanent state of
spiritual attainment. It does not signify destruction or
annihilation. It denotes the belief in the great root of life and
spirit." It is Nirvana of Zen to enjoy bliss for all sufferings of
life. It is Nirvana of Zen to be serene in mind for all disturbances
of actual existence. It is Nirvana of Zen to be in the conscious
union with Universal Life or Buddha through Enlightenment.


A commentator of Saddharma-pundarika-sutra.






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