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Buddhism

The Sermon Of The Inanimate
The Scripture of Zen is written with facts simple and familia...

Life In The Concrete
Life in the concrete, which we are living, greatly differs fr...

The Bad Are The Good In The Egg
This is not only the case with a robber or a murderer, but al...

The Ten Pictures Of The Cowherd
The pictures were drawn by Kwoh Ngan (Kaku-an), a Chinese...

The First Step In The Mental Training
Some of the old Zen masters are said to have attained to supr...

Thing-in-itself Means Thing-knowerless
How, then, did philosophers come to consider reality to be un...

Zen And Nirvana
The beatitude of Zen is Nirvana, not in the Hinayanistic sens...

Decline Of Zen
The blooming prosperity of Zen was over towards the end of th...

Life Consists In Conflict
Life consists in conflict. So long as man remains a social a...

How To Worship Buddha
The author of Vimalakirtti-nirdeca-sutra well explains our at...

The Buddha Of Mercy
Milton says: "Virtue may be assailed, but never hurt; Sur...

Buddha Is Unnamable
Give a definite name to Deity, He would be no more than what ...

The Absolute And Reality Are But An Abstraction
A grain of sand you, trample upon has a deeper significance t...

Nature And Her Lesson
Nature offers us nectar and ambrosia every day, and everywher...

The Social State Of Japan When Zen Was Established By Ei-sai And Do-gen
Now we have to observe the condition of the country when Zen ...

The Awakening Of The Innermost Wisdom
Having set ourselves free from the misconception of Self, nex...

The Breathing Exercise Of The Yogi
Breathing exercise is one of the practices of Yoga, and somew...

Nature Favours Nothing In Particular
There is another point of view of life, which gave the presen...

Man Is Bad-natured According To Siun Tsz Jun-shi
The weaknesses of Mencius's theory are fully exposed by anoth...

Zazen Or The Sitting In Meditation
Habit comes out of practice, and forms character by degrees, ...




The Second And The Third Patriarchs








After the death of the First Patriarch, in A.D. 528, Hwui Ko did his
best to propagate the new faith over sixty years. On one occasion a
man suffering from some chronic disease called on him, and requested
him in earnest: "Pray, Reverend Sir, be my confessor and grant me
absolution, for I suffer long from an incurable disease." "Bring out
your sin (if there be such a thing as sin)," replied the Second
Patriarch, "here before me. I shall grant you absolution." "It is
impossible," said the man after a short consideration, "to seek out
my sin." "Then," exclaimed the master, "I have absolved you.
Henceforth live up to Buddha, Dharma, and Samgha." "I know,
your reverence," said the man, "that you belong to Samgha; but what
are Buddha and Dharma?" "Buddha is Mind itself. Mind itself is
Dharma. Buddha is identical with Dharma. So is Samgha." "Then I
understand," replied the man, "there is no such thing as sin within
my body nor without it, nor anywhere else. Mind is beyond and above
sin. It is no other than Buddha and Dharma." Thereupon the Second
Patriarch saw the man was well qualified to be taught in the new
faith, and converted him, giving him the name of Sang Tsung (So-san).
After two years' instruction and discipline, he bestowed on
Sang Tsung the Kachaya handed down from Bodhidharma, and authorized
him as the Third Patriarch. It is by Sang Tsung that the doctrine of
Zen was first reduced to writing by his composition of Sin Sin
Ming (Sin zin-mei, On Faith and Mind), a metrical exposition of the
faith.


The so-called Three Treasures of the Buddha, the Law, and
the Order.

The Second Patriarch died in A.D. 593--that is, sixty-five
years after the departure of the First Patriarch.

A good many commentaries were written on the book, and it is
considered as one of the best books on Zen.





Next: The Fourth Patriarch And The Emperor Tai Tsung Tai-so

Previous: Bodhidharma's Disciples And The Transmission Of The Law



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