Faba vulgaris The Broad Bean is a thrifty plant, as hardy as any in the garden, and very accommodating as to soil. It is quite at home on heavy land, but in common with nearly all other vegetables it thrives on a deep sandy loam. Consider... Read more of BROAD BEAN at Home Gardening.caInformational Site Network Informational
Privacy
   Home - Samurai - Code of Honor - Courage - Samuri Religion - History of Buddism

Buddhism

Nature And Her Lesson
Nature offers us nectar and ambrosia every day, and everywher...

The Usual Explanation Of The Canon
An eminent Chinese Buddhist scholar, well known as Ten Dai Da...

Life In The Concrete
Life in the concrete, which we are living, greatly differs fr...

Shakya Muni And The Prodigal Son
A great trouble with us is that we do not believe in half the...

The Four Alternatives And The Five Categories
There are, according to Zen, the four classes of religious an...

Decline Of Zen
The blooming prosperity of Zen was over towards the end of th...

The Five Ranks Of Merit
Thus far we have stated how to train our body and mind accord...

Buddha-nature Is The Common Source Of Morals
Furthermore, Buddha-nature or real self, being the seat of lo...

Three Important Elements Of Zen
To understand how Zen developed during some four hundred year...

Man Is Good-natured According To Mencius
Oriental scholars, especially the Chinese men of letters, see...

The Law Of Balance In Life
It is also the case with human affairs. Social positions hig...

The Courage And The Composure Of Mind Of The Zen Monk And Of The Samurai
Fourthly, our Samurai encountered death, as is well known, wi...

Man Is Bad-natured According To Siun Tsz Jun-shi
The weaknesses of Mencius's theory are fully exposed by anoth...

The Establishment Of The Rin Zai School Of Zen In Japan
The Lin Tsi school was started by Nan Yoh, a prominent d...

There Is No Mortal Who Is Purely Moral
By nature man should be either good or bad; or he should be g...

The Errors Of Philosophical Pessimists And Religious Optimists
Philosophical pessimists maintain that there are on earth ma...

Life And Change
Transformation and change are the essential features of life;...

Zen And Supernatural Power
Yoga claims that various supernatural powers can be acquired ...

The Absolute And Reality Are But An Abstraction
A grain of sand you, trample upon has a deeper significance t...

The Third Step In The Mental Training
To be the lord of mind is more essential to Enlightenment, wh...




Bodhidharma's Disciples And The Transmission Of The Law








For details, see Chwen Tang Luh and Den Ka Roku, by Kei Zan.
As for the life of Bodhidharma, Dr. B. Matsumoto's 'A Life of
Bodhidharma' may well be recommended to the reader.


Bodhidharma's labour of nine years in China resulted in the
initiation of a number of disciples, whom some time before his death
he addressed as follows: "Now the time (of my departure from this
world) is at hand. Say, one and all, how do you understand the Law?"
Tao Fu (Do-fuku) said in response to this: "The Law does not lie in
the letters (of the Scriptures), according to my view, nor is it
separated from them, but it works." The Master said: "Then you have
obtained my skin." Next Tsung Chi (So-ji), a nun, replied: "As
Ananda saw the kingdom of Aksobhya only once but not
twice, so I understand the Law". The master said: "Then you have
attained to my flesh." Then Tao Yuh (Do-iku) replied: "The four
elements are unreal from the first, nor are the five
aggregates really existent. All is emptiness according to my
view." The master said: "Then you have acquired my bone." Lastly,
Hwui Ko (E-ka), which was the Buddhist name given by Bodhidharma, to
Shang Kwang, made a polite bow to the teacher and stood in his place
without a word. "You have attained to my marrow." So saying,
Bodhidharma handed over the sacred Kachaya, which he had
brought from India to Hwui Ko, as a symbol of the transmission of the
Law, and created him the Second Patriarch.


A favourite disciple of Shakya Muni, and the Third Patriarch
of Zen.

The: name means I Immovable,' and represents the firmness of
thought.

Earth, water, fire, and air.

(1) Rupa, or form; (2) Vedana, or perception; (3) Samjnya,
or consciousness; (4) Karman (or Samskara), or action; (5) Vijnyana,
or knowledge.

The clerical cloak, which is said to have been dark green.
It became an object of great veneration after the Sixth Patriarch,
who abolished the patriarchal system and did not hand the symbol over
to successors.






Next: The Second And The Third Patriarchs

Previous: Bodhidharma And His Successor The Second Patriarch



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 1792