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Buddhism

Zen Is Not Nihilistic
Zen judged from ancient Zen masters' aphorisms may seem, at t...

A Sutra Equal In Size To The Whole World
The holy writ that Zen masters admire is not one of parchment...

Buddha Dwelling In The Individual Mind
Enlightened Consciousness in the individual mind acquires for...

Universal Life Is Universal Spirit
These considerations naturally lead us to see that Universal ...

Missionary Activity Of The Sixth Patriarch
As we have seen above, the Sixth Patriarch was a great genius...

The Manliness Of The Zen Monk And Of The Samurai
Thirdly, both the Zen monk and the Samurai were distinguished...

The Fourth Patriarch And The Emperor Tai Tsung Tai-so
The Third Patriarch was succeeded by Tao Sin (Do-shin), who ...

Wang Yang Ming O-yo-mei And A Thief
One evening when Wang was giving a lecture to a number of stu...

Scripture Is No More Than Waste Paper
Zen is not based on any particular sutra, either of Mahaya...

The Development Of The Southern And Of The Northern School Of Zen
After the death of the Fifth Patriarch the venerable Shang Si...

Zen In The Dark Age
The latter half of the Ashikaga period was the age of arms an...

The Progress And Hope Of Life
How many myriads of years have passed since the germs of life...

There Is No Mortal Who Is Purely Moral
By nature man should be either good or bad; or he should be g...

An Illusion Concerning Appearance And Reality
To get Enlightened we must next dispel an illusion respecting...

The Social State Of Japan When Zen Was Established By Ei-sai And Do-gen
Now we have to observe the condition of the country when Zen ...

The Method Of Instruction Adopted By Zen Masters
Thus far we have described the doctrine of Zen inculcated by ...

Man Is Bad-natured According To Siun Tsz Jun-shi
The weaknesses of Mencius's theory are fully exposed by anoth...

Nature Favours Nothing In Particular
There is another point of view of life, which gave the presen...

The Introduction Of The So-to School Of Zen
This school was started by Tsing-Yuen (Sei-gen), an emine...

Enlightenment Is Beyond Description And Analysis
In the foregoing chapters we have had several occasions to re...




Bodhidharma's Disciples And The Transmission Of The Law








For details, see Chwen Tang Luh and Den Ka Roku, by Kei Zan.
As for the life of Bodhidharma, Dr. B. Matsumoto's 'A Life of
Bodhidharma' may well be recommended to the reader.


Bodhidharma's labour of nine years in China resulted in the
initiation of a number of disciples, whom some time before his death
he addressed as follows: "Now the time (of my departure from this
world) is at hand. Say, one and all, how do you understand the Law?"
Tao Fu (Do-fuku) said in response to this: "The Law does not lie in
the letters (of the Scriptures), according to my view, nor is it
separated from them, but it works." The Master said: "Then you have
obtained my skin." Next Tsung Chi (So-ji), a nun, replied: "As
Ananda saw the kingdom of Aksobhya only once but not
twice, so I understand the Law". The master said: "Then you have
attained to my flesh." Then Tao Yuh (Do-iku) replied: "The four
elements are unreal from the first, nor are the five
aggregates really existent. All is emptiness according to my
view." The master said: "Then you have acquired my bone." Lastly,
Hwui Ko (E-ka), which was the Buddhist name given by Bodhidharma, to
Shang Kwang, made a polite bow to the teacher and stood in his place
without a word. "You have attained to my marrow." So saying,
Bodhidharma handed over the sacred Kachaya, which he had
brought from India to Hwui Ko, as a symbol of the transmission of the
Law, and created him the Second Patriarch.


A favourite disciple of Shakya Muni, and the Third Patriarch
of Zen.

The: name means I Immovable,' and represents the firmness of
thought.

Earth, water, fire, and air.

(1) Rupa, or form; (2) Vedana, or perception; (3) Samjnya,
or consciousness; (4) Karman (or Samskara), or action; (5) Vijnyana,
or knowledge.

The clerical cloak, which is said to have been dark green.
It became an object of great veneration after the Sixth Patriarch,
who abolished the patriarchal system and did not hand the symbol over
to successors.






Next: The Second And The Third Patriarchs

Previous: Bodhidharma And His Successor The Second Patriarch



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