Xlf.ca Home Samurai Code of Honor Courage Samuri Religion - History of Buddism

Buddhism

A Sutra Equal In Size To The Whole World
The holy writ that Zen masters admire is not one of parchment...

The Four Alternatives And The Five Categories
There are, according to Zen, the four classes of religious an...

Zazen Or The Sitting In Meditation
Habit comes out of practice, and forms character by degrees, ...

The Sermon Of The Inanimate
The Scripture of Zen is written with facts simple and familia...

Where Then Does The Error Lie?
Where, then, does the error lie in the four possible proposit...

The Usual Explanation Of The Canon
An eminent Chinese Buddhist scholar, well known as Ten Dai Da...

Zen After The Downfall Of The Ho-jo Regency
Towards the end of the Ho-Jo period, and after the downfall o...

Pessimistic View Of The Ancient Hindus
In addition to this, the new theory of matter has entirely ov...

Thing-in-itself Means Thing-knowerless
How, then, did philosophers come to consider reality to be un...

All The Worlds In Ten Directions Are Buddha's Holy Land
We are to resume this problem in the following chapter. Suff...

The Fifth And The Sixth Patriarchs
Tao Sin transmitted the Law to Hung Jan (Ko-nin), who being e...

Where Does The Root Of The Illusion Lie?
Now let us examine where illusion lies hidden from the view o...

Our Conception Of Buddha Is Not Final
Has, then, the divine nature of Universal Spirit been complet...

The Resemblance Of The Zen Monk To The Samurai
Let us point out in brief the similarities between Zen and Ja...

The Application Of The Law Of Causation To Morals
Although it may be needless to state here the law of causatio...

The Ten Pictures Of The Cowherd
The pictures were drawn by Kwoh Ngan (Kaku-an), a Chinese...

Universal Life Is Universal Spirit
These considerations naturally lead us to see that Universal ...

Zen And Nirvana
The beatitude of Zen is Nirvana, not in the Hinayanistic sens...

The Breathing Exercise Of The Yogi
Breathing exercise is one of the practices of Yoga, and somew...

The Mystery Of Life
Thus far we have pointed out the inevitable conflictions in l...




Introduction Of Zen Into China By Bodhidharma








An epoch-making event took place in the Buddhist history of China by
Bodhidharma's coming over from Southern India to that country in
about A.D. 520. It was the introduction, not of the dead
scriptures, as was repeatedly done before him, but of a living faith,
not of any theoretical doctrine, but of practical Enlightenment, not
of the relies of Buddha, but of the Spirit of Shakya Muni; so that
Bodhidharma's position as a representative of Zen was unique. He
was, however, not a missionary to be favourably received by the
public. He seems to have behaved in a way quite opposite to that in
which a modern pastor treats his flock. We imagine him to have been
a religious teacher entirely different in every point from a popular
Christian missionary of our age. The latter would smile or try to
smile at every face he happens to see and would talk sociably; while
the former would not smile at any face, but would stare at it with
the large glaring eyes that penetrated to the innermost soul. The
latter would keep himself scrupulously clean, shaving, combing,
brushing, polishing, oiling, perfuming, while the former would be
entirely indifferent to his apparel, being always clad in a faded
yellow robe. The latter would compose his sermon with a great care,
making use of rhetorical art, and speak with force and elegance;
while the former would sit as absolutely silent as the bear, and kick
one off, if one should approach him with idle questions.


Buddhist historians differ in opinion respecting the date of
Bodhidharma's appearance in China. Compare Chwen Fah Chan Tsung Lun
(Den bo sho ju ron) and Hwui Yuen (E-gen).






Next: Bodhidharma And The Emperor Wu

Previous: Origin Of Zen In India



Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
ADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 1477