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Zen After The Downfall Of The Ho-jo Regency
Towards the end of the Ho-Jo period, and after the downfall o...

The World Is In The Making
Our assertion is far from assuming that life is now complete,...

Zen And Supernatural Power
Yoga claims that various supernatural powers can be acquired ...

Zazen Or The Sitting In Meditation
Habit comes out of practice, and forms character by degrees, ...

Enlightened Consciousness
In addition to these considerations, which mainly depend on i...

There Is No Mortal Who Is Non-moral Or Purely Immoral
The same is the case with the third and the fourth class of p...

Nature And Her Lesson
Nature offers us nectar and ambrosia every day, and everywher...

Life In The Concrete
Life in the concrete, which we are living, greatly differs fr...

The Honest Poverty Of The Zen Monk And The Samurai
Secondly, the so-called honest poverty is a characteristic of...

Enlightenment Implies An Insight Into The Nature Of Self
We cannot pass over, however, this weighty problem without sa...

The Mystery Of Life
Thus far we have pointed out the inevitable conflictions in l...

Zen In The Dark Age
The latter half of the Ashikaga period was the age of arms an...

Change As Seen By Zen
Zen, like Hinayanism, does not deny the doctrine of Transienc...

Zen Is Iconoclastic
For the followers of Bodhidharma, however, this conception of...

Life And Change
Transformation and change are the essential features of life;...

Buddha Is Unnamable
Give a definite name to Deity, He would be no more than what ...

The Resemblance Of The Zen Monk To The Samurai
Let us point out in brief the similarities between Zen and Ja...

The Ancient Buddhist Pantheon
The ancient Buddhist pantheon was full of deities or Buddhas,...

The Usual Explanation Of The Canon
An eminent Chinese Buddhist scholar, well known as Ten Dai Da...

There Is No Mortal Who Is Purely Moral
By nature man should be either good or bad; or he should be g...




The Law Of Balance








Nature governs the world with her law of balance. She puts things
ever in pairs, and leaves nothing in isolation. Positives
stand in opposition to negatives, actives to passives, males to
females, and so on. Thus we get the ebb in opposition to the flood
tide; the centrifugal force to the centripetal; attraction to
repulsion; growth to decay; toxin to antitoxin; light to shade;
action to reaction; unity to variety; day to night; the animate to
the inanimate. Look at our own bodies: the right eye is placed side
by side with the left; the left shoulder with the right; the right
lung with the left; the left hemisphere of the brain with that of the
right; and so forth.


Zenists call them 'pairs of opposites.'


It holds good also in human affairs: advantage is always accompanied
by disadvantage; loss by gain; convenience by inconvenience; good by
evil; rise by fall; prosperity by adversity; virtue by vice; beauty
by deformity; pain by pleasure; youth by old age; life by death. 'A
handsome young lady of quality,' a parable in Mahaparinirvana-sutra
tells us, 'who carries with her an immense treasure is ever
accompanied by her sister, an ugly woman in rags, who destroys
everything within her reach. If we win the former, we must also get
the latter.' As pessimists show intense dislike towards the latter
and forget the former, so optimists admire the former so much that
they are indifferent to the latter.






Next: Life Consists In Conflict

Previous: The Errors Of Philosophical Pessimists And Religious Optimists



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