Xlf.ca Home Samurai Code of Honor Courage Samuri Religion - History of Buddism

Buddhism

The Great Person And Small Person
For these reasons Zen proposes to call man Buddha-natured or ...

Man Is Both Good-natured And Bad-natured According To Yan Hiung Yo-yu
According to Yang Hiung and his followers, good is no less re...

Idealistic Scepticism Concerning Objective Reality
But extreme Idealism identifies 'to be' with 'to be known,' a...

Idealistic Scepticism Concerning Religion And Morality
Similarly, it is the case with religion and morality. If we ...

Epicureanism And Life
There are a good many people always buoyant in spirit and mir...

The Beatitude Of Zen
We are far from denying, as already shown in the foregoing ch...

Man Is Neither Good-natured Nor Bad-natured According To Su Shi
(So-shoku). The difficulty may be avoided by a theory given ...

The Development Of The Southern And Of The Northern School Of Zen
After the death of the Fifth Patriarch the venerable Shang Si...

The Method Of Instruction Adopted By Zen Masters
Thus far we have described the doctrine of Zen inculcated by ...

Life Change And Hope
The doctrine of Transcience never drives us to the pessimisti...

The Creative Force Of Nature And Humanity
The innate tendency of self-preservation, which manifests its...

Buddha Dwelling In The Individual Mind
Enlightened Consciousness in the individual mind acquires for...

Life Consists In Conflict
Life consists in conflict. So long as man remains a social a...

The Parable Of The Monk And The Stupid Woman
The confused or unenlightened may be compared with a monk and...

Pessimistic View Of The Ancient Hindus
In addition to this, the new theory of matter has entirely ov...

The Sermon Of The Inanimate
The Scripture of Zen is written with facts simple and familia...

Difficulties Are No Match For The Optimist
How can we suppose that we, the children of Buddha, are put a...

The Spiritual Attainment Of The Sixth Patriarch
Some time before his death (in 675 A.D.) the Fifth Patriarch ...

An Illusion Concerning Appearance And Reality
To get Enlightened we must next dispel an illusion respecting...

The Ten Pictures Of The Cowherd
The pictures were drawn by Kwoh Ngan (Kaku-an), a Chinese...




The Resemblance Of The Zen Monk To The Samurai








Let us point out in brief the similarities between Zen and Japanese
chivalry. First, both the Samurai and the Zen monk have to undergo a
strict discipline and endure privation without complaint. Even such
a prominent teacher as Ei-sai, for example, lived contentedly in such
needy circumstances that on one occasion he and his disciples
had nothing to eat for several days. Fortunately, they were
requested by a believer to recite the Scriptures, and presented with
two rolls of silk. The hungry young monks, whose mouths watered
already at the expectation of a long-looked-for dinner, were
disappointed when that silk was given to a poor man, who called on
Ei-sai to obtain some help. Fast continued for a whole week, when
another poor follow came in and asked Ei-sai to give something. At
this time, having nothing to show his substantial mark of sympathy
towards the poor, Ei-sai tore off the gilt glory of the image of
Buddha Bhecajya and gave it. The young monks, bitten both by hunger
and by anger at this outrageous act to the object of worship,
questioned Ei-sai by way of reproach: "Is it, sir, right for us
Buddhists to demolish the image of a Buddha?" "Well," replied Ei-sai
promptly, "Buddha would give even his own life for the sake of
suffering people. How could he be reluctant to give his halo?" This
anecdote clearly shows us self-sacrifice is of first importance in
the Zen discipline.

The incident is told by Do-gen in his Zui-mon-ki.






Next: The Honest Poverty Of The Zen Monk And The Samurai

Previous: The Social State Of Japan When Zen Was Established By Ei-sai And Do-gen



Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
ADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 1545