VIEW THE MOBILE VERSION of www.xlf.ca Informational Site Network Informational
Privacy
   Home - Samurai - Code of Honor - Courage - Samuri Religion - History of Buddism

Samurai

The Betterment Of Life
Again, people nowadays seem to feel keenly the wound of the ...

Retribution In The Past The Present And The Future Life
Then a question suggests itself: If there be no soul that su...

The Third Step In The Mental Training
To be the lord of mind is more essential to Enlightenment, wh...

Zen After The Restoration
After the Restoration of the Mei-ji (1867) the popularity of ...

All The Worlds In Ten Directions Are Buddha's Holy Land
We are to resume this problem in the following chapter. Suff...

Nature And Her Lesson
Nature offers us nectar and ambrosia every day, and everywher...

Life Consists In Conflict
Life consists in conflict. So long as man remains a social a...

The Second And The Third Patriarchs
After the death of the First Patriarch, in A.D. 528, Hwui Ko ...

The Next Step In The Mental Training
In the next place we have to strive to be the master of our b...

Epicureanism And Life
There are a good many people always buoyant in spirit and mir...

The Mystery Of Life
Thus far we have pointed out the inevitable conflictions in l...

Difficulties Are No Match For The Optimist
How can we suppose that we, the children of Buddha, are put a...

Enlightened Consciousness
In addition to these considerations, which mainly depend on i...

Man Is Bad-natured According To Siun Tsz
The weaknesses of Mencius's theory are fully exposed by anot...

Introduction Of Zen Into China By Bodhidharma
An epoch-making event took place in the Buddhist history of C...

The Disciples Under The Sixth Patriarch
Some time after this the Sixth Patriarch settled himself down...

The Social State Of Japan When Zen Was Established By Ei-sai And Do-gen
Now we have to observe the condition of the country when Zen ...

The Resemblance Of The Zen Monk To The Samurai
Let us point out in brief the similarities between Zen and Ja...

Man Is Both Good-natured And Bad-natured According To Yan Hiung
According to Yang Hiung and his followers, good is no less re...

The Examination Of The Notion Of Self
The belief in immortality is based on the strong instinct of ...




The Honest Poverty Of The Zen Monk And The Samurai








Secondly, the so-called honest poverty is a characteristic of both
the Zen monk and the Samurai. To get rich by an ignoble means is
against the rules of Japanese chivalry or Bushido. The Samurai would
rather starve than to live by some expedient unworthy of his dignity.
There are many instances, in the Japanese history, of Samurais who
were really starved to death in spite of their having a hundred
pieces of gold carefully preserved to meet the expenses at the time
of an emergency; hence the proverb: The falcon would not feed on the
ear of corn, even if he should starve. Similarly, we know of no
case of Zen monks, ancient and modern, who got rich by any ignoble
means. They would rather face poverty with gladness of heart.
Fu-gai, one of the most distinguished Zen masters just before the
Restoration, supported many student monks in his monastery. They
were often too numerous to be supported by his scant means. This
troubled his disciple much whose duty it was to look after the
food-supply, as there was no other means to meet the increased demand
than to supply with worse stuff. Accordingly, one day the disciple
advised Fu-gai not to admit new students any more into the monastery.
Then the master, making no reply, lolled out his tongue and said:
Now look into my mouth, and tell if there be any tongue in it. The
perplexed disciple answered affirmatively. Then don't bother
yourself about it. If there be any tongue, I can taste any sort of
food. Honest poverty may, without exaggeration, be called one of
the characteristics of the Samurais and of the Zen monks; hence a
proverb: The Zen monk has no money, moneyed Monto[FN#82] knows
nothing.


[FN#82] The priest belonging to Shin Shu, who are generally rich.






Next: The Manliness Of The Zen Monk And Of The Samurai

Previous: The Resemblance Of The Zen Monk To The Samurai



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 3963