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The Examination Of The Notion Of Self
The belief in immortality is based on the strong instinct of ...

The Disciples Under The Sixth Patriarch
Some time after this the Sixth Patriarch settled himself down...

Introduction Of Zen Into China By Bodhidharma
An epoch-making event took place in the Buddhist history of C...

The Parable Of The Robber Kih
Chwang Tsz (So-shi) remarks in a humorous way to the followi...

The First Step In The Mental Training
Some of the old Zen masters are said to have attained to supr...

Do Thy Best And Leave The Rest To Providence
There is another point of view which enables us to enjoy life...

Man Is Bad-natured According To Siun Tsz
The weaknesses of Mencius's theory are fully exposed by anot...

Man Is Good-natured According To Mencius
Oriental scholars, especially the Chinese men of letters, se...

The Eternal Life As Taught By Professor Munsterberg
Some philosophical pessimists undervalue life simply because ...

Origin Of Zen In India
To-day Zen as a living faith can be found in its pure form on...

Man Is Both Good-natured And Bad-natured According To Yan Hiung
According to Yang Hiung and his followers, good is no less re...

The Ten Pictures Of The Cowherd
[FN#275] The pictures were drawn by Kwoh Ngan (Kaku-an), a...

The World Is In The Making
Our assertion is far from assuming that life is now complete,...

The Development Of The Southern And Of The Northern School Of Zen
After the death of the Fifth Patriarch the venerable Shang Si...

The Four Alternatives And The Five Categories
There are, according to Zen, the four classes of religious an...

The Characteristics Of Do-gen The Founder Of The Japanese So To Sect
In the meantime seekers after a new truth gradually began to ...

The Sermon Of The Inanimate
The Scripture of Zen is written with facts simple and familia...

Where Does The Root Of The Illusion Lie?
Now let us examine where illusion lies hidden from the view o...

Life And Change
A peculiar phase of life is change which appears in the form ...

Hinayanism And Its Doctrine
The doctrine of Transience was the first entrance gate of Hin...




The Parable Of The Monk And The Stupid Woman








The confused or unenlightened may be compared with a monk and a
stupid woman in a Japanese parable which runs as follows: One
evening a monk (who was used to have his head shaved clean), getting
drunk against the moral precepts, visited a woman, known as a
blockhead, at her house. No sooner had he got into her room than the
female fell asleep so soundly that the monk could not wake her nap.
Thereupon he made up his mind to use every possible means to arouse
her, and searched and searched all over the room for some instrument
that would help him in his task of arousing her from death-like
slumber. Fortunately, he found a razor in one of the drawers of her
mirror stand. With it he gave a stroke to her hair, but she did not
stir a whit. Then came another stroke, and she snored like thunder.
The third and fourth strokes came, but with no better result. And at
last her head was shaven clean, yet still she slept on. The next
morning when she awoke, she could not find her visitor, the monk, as
he had left the house in the previous night. 'Where is my visitor,
where my dear monk?' she called aloud, and waking in a state of
somnambulation looked for him in vain, repeating the outcry. When at
length her hand accidentally touched her shaven head, she mistook it
for that of her visitor, and exclaimed: 'Here you are, my dear, where
am I myself gone then? A great trouble with the confused is their
forgetting of real self or Buddha-nature, and not knowing 'where it
is gone.' Duke Ngai, of the State of Lu, once said to Confucius:
One of my subjects, Sir, is so much forgetful that he forgot to take
his wife when be changed his residence. That is not much, my
lord, said the sage, the Emperors Kieh[FN#173] and Cheu[FN#174]
forgot their own selves.[FN#175]


[FN#173] The last Emperor of the Ha dynasty, notorious for his
vices. His reign was 1818-1767 B.C.

[FN#174] The last Emperor of the Yin dynasty, one of the worst
despots. His reign was 1154-1122 B.C.

[FN#175] Ko-shi-ke-go.






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