Two convicts are locked in a cell. There is an unbarred window high up in the cell. No matter if they stand on the bed or one on top of the other they can't reach the window to escape. They then decide to tunnel out. However, they give up with the tu... Read more of Cell breakout at Free Jokes.caInformational Site Network Informational
Privacy
   Home - Samurai - Code of Honor - Courage - Samuri Religion - History of Buddism

Samurai

Bodhidharma And The Emperor Wu
No sooner had Bodhidharma landed at Kwang Cheu in Southern Ch...

The Resemblance Of The Zen Monk To The Samurai
Let us point out in brief the similarities between Zen and Ja...

Flight Of The Sixth Patriarch
On the following morning the news of what had happened during...

Zazen Or The Sitting In Meditation
Habit comes out of practice, and forms character by degrees, ...

The Examination Of The Notion Of Self
The belief in immortality is based on the strong instinct of ...

Sutras Used By Zen Masters
Ten Dai failed to explain away the discrepancies and contradi...

The Betterment Of Life
Again, people nowadays seem to feel keenly the wound of the ...

Zen In The Dark Age
The latter half of the Ashikaga period was the age of arms an...

Zen Under The Toku-gana Shogunate
Peace was at last restored by Iye-yasu, the founder of the To...

Idealism Is A Potent Medicine For Self-created Mental Disease
In so far as Buddhist idealism refers to the world of sense, ...

Change As Seen By Zen
Zen, like Hinayanism, does not deny the doctrine of Transienc...

The Social State Of Japan When Zen Was Established By Ei-sai And Do-gen
Now we have to observe the condition of the country when Zen ...

Pessimistic View Of The Ancient Hindus
In addition to this, the new theory of matter has entirely ov...

Great Men And Nature
All great men, whether they be poets or scientists or religio...

Poetical Intuition And Zen
Since Universal Life or Spirit permeates the universe, the po...

Thing-in-itself Means Thing-knowerless
How, then, did philosophers come to consider reality to be un...

Enlightened Consciousness
In addition to these considerations, which mainly depend on i...

The Characteristics Of Do-gen The Founder Of The Japanese So To Sect
In the meantime seekers after a new truth gradually began to ...

Zen After The Restoration
After the Restoration of the Mei-ji (1867) the popularity of ...

Let Go Of Your Idle Thoughts
[FN#263] A famous Zenist, Mu-go-koku-shi, is said to ha...




The Development Of The Southern And Of The Northern School Of Zen








After the death of the Fifth Patriarch the venerable Shang Siu,
though not the legitimate successor of his master, was not inactive
in the propagation of the faith, and gathered about him a number of
enthusiastic admirers. This led to the foundation of the Northern
school of Zen in opposition to the Southern school led by the Sixth
Patriarch. The Empress Tseh Tien Wa Heu,[FN#45] the real ruler of
China at that time, was an admirer of Shang Siu, and patronized his
school, which nevertheless made no further development.


[FN#45] The Emperor Chung Tsung (Chu-so, A.D. 684-704) was a nominal
sovereign, and the Empress was the real ruler from A.D. 684 to 705.


In the meanwhile the Sixth Patriarch, who had gone to the South,
arrived at the Fah Sing Monastery in Kwang Cheu, where Yin Tsung
(In-shu), the abbot, was giving lectures on the Mahayana sutras to a
number of student monks. It was towards evening that he happened to
overhear two monks of the Monastery discussing about the flag
floating in air. One of them said: It is the wind that moves in
reality, but not the flag. No, objected the other, it is the
flag that moves in reality, but not the wind. Thus each of them
insisted on his own one-sided view, and came to no proper conclusion.
Then the Sixth Patriarch introduced himself and said to them: It is
neither the wind nor the flag, but your mind that moves in reality.
Yin Tsung, having heard these words of the stranger, was greatly
astonished, and thought the latter should have been an extraordinary
personage. And when he found the man to be the Sixth Patriarch of
Zen, he and all his disciples decided to follow Zen under the master.
Consequently Hwui Nang, still clad like a layman, changed his
clothes, and began his patriarchal career at that Monastery. This is
the starting-point of the great development of Zen in China.






Next: Missionary Activity Of The Sixth Patriarch

Previous: Flight Of The Sixth Patriarch



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 2944